Accessibility for User Experience Designers

In this post, JavaScript Developer Matt Isner details the ins and outs of accessible design for user experience designers. Matt covers everything from the initial design stage to the technical specifics, with several tips and practical "Deque How To" hacks to help you ensure that your website is accessible by design. Remember, solving accessibility problems means improving usability for everyone! Continue Reading Accessibility for User Experience Designers

A11y Hacks for the Blind: Navigating GitHub & the W3C

Birkir Gunnarsson is a former Senior Subject Matter Expert for Deque. Recently, he helped form BATS (Blind Accessibility Testers Society), which is dedicated to helping blind web users working in the field of accessibility. This post is a recap of Birkir's contributions to BATS, where he details how to use GitHub with a screenreader and participate in conference calls for the W3C. Continue Reading A11y Hacks for the Blind: Navigating GitHub & the W3C

Translating Accessibility Issues Into Agile Solutions

At Deque, we pride ourselves on delivering a complete set of tools and services to help our customers achieve success in web accessibility. The meaning of "complete" in this context is ever evolving, however. As we learn what our customers need in order to succeed, we react by incorporating their needs into our offerings. Recently, in direct response to such a need, we learned how… Continue Reading Translating Accessibility Issues Into Agile Solutions

Accessibility Testing with the NVDA Screenreader

This is the first post in a two-part series on Accessibility Testing for Developers by Matt Isner, a developer here at Deque Systems. For today's post, Matt has created a video demonstration for sighted developers on how to install and configure the NVDA screen reader for accessibility testing. (Please note: NVDA is for Windows only.) In this video Matt will cover... Why we've chosen to… Continue Reading Accessibility Testing with the NVDA Screenreader

Use of Color in Mobile Applications

This post was co-authored by Chris McMeeking, Alistair Barrell, and Jennifer Dailey. How applications use color can cause issues for users with disabilities. For non-sighted users, using colors to denote information, such as the role of items, is problematic. It's dangerous to assume that users have access to trait information through VoiceOver. Users with color blindness or other visual disabilities may have trouble distinguishing these… Continue Reading Use of Color in Mobile Applications

Prevent Confusing Acronym Announcements in Android

This post was co-authored by Chris McMeeking and Alistair Barrell. When doing accessibility testing, how often do you listen to the entire duration of a long announcement? For example, if you were to focus this paragraph with TalkBack, what would you listen to? The entire thing? Or would you listen to the first few bits, and then read the rest of the text, assuming the Android… Continue Reading Prevent Confusing Acronym Announcements in Android

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