Inclusive Design Tips: Presenting Information in Multiple Ways

image of colored pencils up close,, meant to illustrate both design, the use of color and the many varieties of people who use the web, all of which ties into inclusive design.

How do you ensure your website is designed with accessibility in mind? Our UX designer Caitlin Geier addresses some important issues to consider, with practical tips - like presenting descriptive text when color cues are used - to help you create accessible design features that everyone can enjoy. Continue Reading Inclusive Design Tips: Presenting Information in Multiple Ways

A11y Hacks for the Blind: Navigating GitHub & the W3C

Birkir Gunnarsson is a former Senior Subject Matter Expert for Deque. Recently, he helped form BATS (Blind Accessibility Testers Society), which is dedicated to helping blind web users working in the field of accessibility. This post is a recap of Birkir's contributions to BATS, where he details how to use GitHub with a screenreader and participate in conference calls for the W3C. Continue Reading A11y Hacks for the Blind: Navigating GitHub & the W3C

Accessibility Testing with the NVDA Screenreader

This is the first post in a two-part series on Accessibility Testing for Developers by Matt Isner, a developer here at Deque Systems. For today's post, Matt has created a video demonstration for sighted developers on how to install and configure the NVDA screen reader for accessibility testing. (Please note: NVDA is for Windows only.) In this video Matt will cover... Why we've chosen to… Continue Reading Accessibility Testing with the NVDA Screenreader

Text Links: Best Practices for Screen Readers

A11Y Expert

Sometimes, the visible anchor text as mandated by the user interface design is not very meaningful to vision impaired users. One could use aria-label or the title attribute or even off-screen text on text links. But what's the best practice based on current assistive technology support? Continue Reading Text Links: Best Practices for Screen Readers

Why Don’t Screen Readers Always Read What’s on the Screen? Part 1: Punctuation and Typographic Symbols

screen readers don't read symbols or punctuation

Screen readers are designed to do one thing: read what's on the screen. That's why they call them screen readers, right? You would think that screen reader software would have perfected the art of reading text by now, because that was the whole reason why screen readers were invented. If there's one thing a screen reader ought to do really well, it's read what's on… Continue Reading Why Don’t Screen Readers Always Read What’s on the Screen? Part 1: Punctuation and Typographic Symbols

Web Accessibility – It‘s always about the users!

hands on keyboard

When I come home from work, after a fun filled day of analyzing website code, my 6-year-old son sometimes asks me "What's your job daddy?" I have to give him a simple answer he can understand, so I tell him my job is to make sure that everyone can go on the Internet. If he keeps asking me further questions, I usually distract him with… Continue Reading Web Accessibility – It‘s always about the users!

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