Access Provides Health Privacy

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My morning dawned bright when I (reluctantly) looked for directions to my dentist.  I was dreading this visit. You cannot imagine my delight when not only did I find their web site accessible, but I found they had an online patient medical history form.  My delight was complete when I was able to fill out and submit the form totally without assistance!

This may not seem like a big deal to most folks, but most times they expect my husband to read the form to me sitting in their waiting room. If he isn't with me, they, after some prompting, read it to me at the patient window. Needless to say there isn't much privacy in either of these methods.

So, at least one dentist has secured my business and provided me with a good experience!

 

Pat Pound is a disability consultant from Austin, Texas who has used technology for many years, starting a training unit for people who are blind in the '80's.  She worked for the State of Texas for many years and shaped disability policy including information accessibility.  She is now "retired" but that just means she only does work she likes!  She is a weaver, game enthusiast, and has trained teachers of visually impaired kids regarding use of IOS devices.  "My own blindness has lead me down many interesting paths and it's such fun now to see how technology can improve our lives!"

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1 comment

  • Paul J. Adam Permalink

    Hi Pat! Glad to see you blogging for Deque! I have heard tales of people having to speak their private health information out loud at medical offices because they almost always use paper forms. Have also heard this could lead to misdiagnosis if the person may not want disclose all their information verbally. You would think that medical offices could afford to capture patient information in an accessible manner with the costs of health care so high! A simple accessible accommodation would be to provide an iPad and head phones with an accessible data capture app or web form. Hopefully I’ll be back in Austin soon and back at the Tech Lunch meetings.

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