Posts By Chris McMeeking

Chris McMeeking is a software engineer and architect at Deque Systems, leading development efforts on Deque’s native mobile accessibility analysis products. His journey in accessibility began through a project at the University of Michigan, The ASK Scanning Keyboard. This application won multiple awards including the $100,000 Intel Innovator’s Award, runner up at the Mobile World Congress, and the Student of Da Vinci award from the Multiple Sclerosis foundation. Chris is the lead developer behind the Android Analyzer, and an active member of the task force developing these new accessibility mobile standards.

More posts from the author...

How to Make Android ImageViews Accessible with Content Descriptions

Developer using Android phone and creating content descriptions

In his latest post about mobile accessibility, Deque’s software engineer and mobile a11y guru Chris McMeeking explains how to make Android ImageViews accessible with content descriptions. Read on for practical how to tips and learn about content description best practices. Continue Reading How to Make Android ImageViews Accessible with Content Descriptions

Why the Android Analyzer is Paving the Way for App Accessibility

Learn about the newest cool tool from Deque: The Android Analyzer, which will help developers create accessible Android apps with the integration of accessibility testing into their development workflow. The Analyzer’s rules have been developed in accordance with emerging WCAG mobile standards. Best of all, it’s built for both manual and automated testing and can be specified to meet developers needs. Continue Reading Why the Android Analyzer is Paving the Way for App Accessibility

An Introduction to Native Mobile Accessibility – Featuring Deque University for iOS/Android

One of the most challenging aspects of mobile accessibility is that most developers,managers, user interface designers, software engineers, etc don’t have a disability that makes the use of websites and mobile apps difficult. That is, they aren’t able to view the process from a user perspective. It’s understandable that this would happen, but it nevertheless makes their job more difficult when it comes to accessibility.… Continue Reading An Introduction to Native Mobile Accessibility – Featuring Deque University for iOS/Android

Common Accessibility Element Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them

Maybe this scenario sounds familiar: You’re working on your iOS application, dabbling with Accessibility.  You know a little bit about how to use VoiceOver and you’re taking a quick look at your app to make sure it’s accessible.  Suddenly you notice a button in the corner. The button is disabled unless a user fills out a certain text field.  You think to yourself: Ugh. I should… Continue Reading Common Accessibility Element Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them

Use of Color in Mobile Applications

This post was co-authored by Chris McMeeking, Alistair Barrell, and Jennifer Dailey. How applications use color can cause issues for users with disabilities. For non-sighted users, using colors to denote information, such as the role of items, is problematic. It’s dangerous to assume that users have access to trait information through VoiceOver. Users with color blindness or other visual disabilities may have trouble distinguishing these… Continue Reading Use of Color in Mobile Applications

Prevent Confusing Acronym Announcements in Android

This post was co-authored by Chris McMeeking and Alistair Barrell. When doing accessibility testing, how often do you listen to the entire duration of a long announcement? For example, if you were to focus this paragraph with TalkBack, what would you listen to? The entire thing? Or would you listen to the first few bits, and then read the rest of the text, assuming the Android… Continue Reading Prevent Confusing Acronym Announcements in Android

Page 1 of 212